Dance Gavin Dance – Caviar (feat. Chino Moreno of Deftones) lyrics

Is trust really that fucking hard?
You make it sound when you let go within the circle
Everyone knows what you wear
That face of doubt
To live without

You speak of awe
(It’s not enough)
And take every word from me
(Fighting everyone that I see
Learning when and where not to be)
You speak of awe
(It’s not enough)
And make every word taste sweet

Why don’t you just
Let me live my life?
I’ve given you more of my self
It’s hard to give that back
Go and make me believe
That I feel complete

There is a
Difficult process
Defense

You speak of awe
(It’s not enough)
And take every word from me
(Fighting everyone that I see
Learning when and where not to be)
You speak of awe
(It’s not enough)
And make every word taste sweet

Would you like us to wave off every battle?
(My invasion is your caviar)
(My invasion of thoughts is your caviar…)
(Stronger, longer, faster, longer…)

Dance Gavin Dance – Strawberry André lyrics

Dressed in time to sip the wine
And cover your head
Nice of you to stay a few
And bleed on my bed
People flake, they wake and bake
Forget what you said
Obviously, not possibly
You didn’t take your meds

And here we go climb
(I got a house with a pool and dog with a three car garage)
And now come home for all these ways to ways to go
(All the way down)

Cut out the signs come inside
Where we lined up all these fashions
I’ll take your wine, just take this side
Into the light arms are wide only when you know

I fear I can’t believe its you (Nice tie, meet me concubine)
I fear I can’t believe its you (She’s not drunk its enthusiasm)
I fear I can’t believe its you (Nice tie, meet me concubine)
I fear (She’s not drunk its enthusiasm)
I fear I can’t believe its you (Nice tie, meet me concubine)
I fear I can’t believe its you (She’s not drunk its enthusiasm)
I fear I can’t believe its you (Lipstick, wet painted faces)
I fear (Of people with no regrets)

Slit her throat on the frying pan
You caught cold and forgot the plan
Turn the dial on the oven…
Until the skin has got that even tan
Slit her throat on the frying pan
You caught cold and forgot the plan
Turn the dial on the oven man
Until the skin has got that even tan

Dressed in time to sip the wine
And cover your head
Nice of you to stay a few
And bleed on my bed
People flake, they wake and bake
Forget what you said
Obviously, not possibly
You didn’t take your meds

I fear I can’t believe its you (Nice tie, meet me concubine)
I fear I can’t believe its you (She’s not drunk its enthusiasm)
I fear I can’t believe its you (Nice tie, meet me concubine)
I fear (She’s not drunk its enthusiasm)
I fear I can’t believe its you (Nice tie, meet me concubine)
I fear I can’t believe its you (She’s not drunk its enthusiasm)
I fear I can’t believe its you (Lipstick, wet painted faces)
I fear (Of people with no regrets)

Oh what?
Come into the light, oh

Dance Gavin Dance – Turn Off The Lights, I’m Watching Back To The Future lyrics

Take the car, and turn it into our alibis
Discard the body, pop some pills and you’ll be fine
Purge, then binge, restart and, insert the sutures
Turn off the lights, I’m watching back to the future
Before we go too far, I wont let you take this light [x2]
Breath in all mistakes without coming clean
Into hobbling faith. No-one I wanna know
Cause we laughed at assimilation
Is this surreal tonight? Well go for all these wins
Is this surreal tonight I’ll go far and I’ll ride

Go on a brush me off. Brush me off brush me off
Waltzing right into the bank
They said that you have got a map of my insides
Purge, then binge, pop some pills and you’ll be fine
Stay back from our lungs
Coming off the lie I will separate.
It only looks only looks so far well fill these holes
Now I am you
Remove the ribs if you can’t lean sideways
I thought my words would have mass appeal
Costs your life, sly as always
I thought my words would have mass appeal
Cover your eyes
I’ve stabbed you in the back
You stop this, I can’t
Please stop me
Right here
I wont do this again
I can’t do this, I love you
For all of this shit
Why, why, Help

Dance Gavin Dance – Midnight Crusade lyrics

[Intro: Tilian]
Used to be so judgemental
Now I respect the ones
Who dare to be sinful
I was searching for my pride
Now I know it’s all fleeting
Just glad to be alive

[Verse 1: Jon Mess]
Brontosaurs fear of art is torn apart by making
Good mistakes and branching out he switch it up like baking
The more I tried to sleep it off the more I started thinking
I wanna live in mushroom park, do unrestricted shrinking

[Pre-Chorus: Tilian]
You’re salty, can’t fault you
I’m numb to the rhythm that guides you
Take all your confetti away

[Chorus: Tilian]
I know, I know what’s killing me
Don’t need your love or sympathy
I know, I know just what you’ll say
Don’t you try to rescue me

[Verse 2: Jon Mess]
Made up magic turtle guy is feeling like he’s crap
He needs to spend some time alone to understand his path
There’s different types of waves and things your mind is tuning to
It takes in information and it sorts it out for you

[Pre-Chorus 2: Tilian]
Won’t fight you, not like you
But I’m numb to the rhythm that guides you
I’ll take your confetti away

[Chorus: Tilian]
I know, I know what’s killing me
Don’t need your love or sympathy
I know, I know just what you’ll say
Don’t you try to rescue me

[Post-Chorus: Tilian]
Don’t you try to rescue me
Don’t you try to rescue me

[Bridge: Tilian]
Now you’re on a midnight crusade
Flexing your stats
But you can’t touch me, touch me, touch me
Tell me how to think my own way
You can give it your best
But you won’t touch me, touch me, touch me

[Breakdown: Jon Mess]
I’m kissing a baby that licking a boot
I live in a deli put meat on your tooth
My business is pregnant and flaunting off nude
I’m smoking a chicken I took out the coupe
Show off addictions and make it sound fiction
You aren’t doing art if you’re dead in the park
If you feel like you died show ’em you have
Give up your life for the virtual clap
Shear off the weird and then watch ’em appear
Now you’re a spiritless fearless lil lyricist
Shear off the weird and then watch ’em appear
Now you’re a spirtless, fearless lil lyricist
Hoax

Dance Gavin Dance – Summertime Gladness lyrics

I followed
Making flirty faces, rounding out the bases
So you’d borrow
Me for the night
Maybe for life

Endorphin orphan morphin
Lemon cheese equally
You know my origin story, born in the cemetery
I’m into stupid apps, like cry-yo-own self back to sleep
My rock is solidbucks, these people ameniti-ties

Must have you misunderstood little girl you’re a dangerous lady
Just because it feels so good that don’t make
That don’t make you my baby

Fed me skittles on a burial ground
Gave me rabies in the back of my car
Shoved that dagger through the back of my heart
Now you’re just another scar

Get another round of weirdo in em
Turn around slow and rear yo head
No one allowed to solve the riddle, ha
(Now you’re just another scar)
1+2 is nine times red

Kiss my kiss yo ass goodbye
Kiss yo ass goodbye
Kiss my kiss yo ass goodbye
Kiss yo ass goodbye
(Now you’re just another scar)

Only on occasion do lose my patience
I just swallow
All of my pride, but I can’t this time
Ohh

I test this cable, I plugged into a tree
I play the tokin tone from straight off the leaf
I got the smoothest roots that spew out the feet
There’s a clue in a plant and it can bite off the teeth of disease

Fed me skittles on a burial ground
Gave me rabies in the back of my car
Shoved that dagger through the back of my heart
Now you’re just another scar

Shoved that dagger through the back of my heart
Now you’re just another scar

Get another round of weirdo in em
Turn around slow and rear yo head
No one allowed to solve the riddle, ha
(Now you’re just another scar)

Kiss my kiss yo ass goodbye
Kiss yo ass goodbye
Kiss my kiss yo ass goodbye
Kiss yo ass goodbye

Kiss my kiss yo ass goodbye
Kiss yo ass goodbye
Kiss my kiss yo ass goodbye
Kiss yo ass goodbye

Kiss my kiss yo ass goodbye
Kiss yo ass goodbye
Kiss my kiss yo ass goodbye
Kiss yo ass goodbye

Just a little scar tissue in the back of my heart

MATRANG – Кино (Movie) lyrics

[Куплет 1: Matrang]
Ты пришла так медленно
Я доплыл до берега
Для тебя лишь преданно
За звездой неведомой

И какой планетой стать
Если цвет невидимый
Обуял решеткою
Ты забыла видимо

Ко мне камни падали
Твой цветок искали там
Я не ведал, что творил
Загорелся пламенем

Ты прости меня, милая
Я душой на луне сижу
Она серая, хилая
Очень сильно тебя прошу

Припев (2х):
Лети со мной в дали
Где всё – кино
Где мы бы не спали
Когда темно
Где небо не больше
Моей мечты
Там ты и я, там я и ты

[Куплет 2: Matrang]
Цветочное озеро
Поезда проносятся
Самолеты летят в ночь
К тебе на руки просятся

Забери меня берег мой
Мне то жарко, то холодно
Потерял равновесие
Только ей вот всё – равно

Уходи тогда, медленно
Как пришла, с улыбкою
Ту что больше луны люблю
И мечту забери мою

Ты прости меня милая
Я душой на луне сижу
Она серая , хилая
Очень сильно тебя прошу

Припев (4х):
Лети со мной в дали
Где всё – кино
Где мы бы не спали
Когда темно
Где небо не больше
Моей мечты
Там ты и я, там я и ты

Parkway Drive – Dead Man’s Chest (feat. Pete Abordi of No Turning Back) lyrics

When your lungs collapse
When your last breath fails
Upon reflection the fatal choice was yours alone
Convulsions constrict your flesh
Into a portrait of agony
Crushed
Into a portrait of agony
Of agony

This, this is cataclysmic failure
As your organs refuse to prevail
This is, this is pointless suffering
How does it feel to know
You brought this shit
On yourself?

The timing of consequence
Your actions have their’ price
I won’t pay for your mistakes
As pity grips your nerves
You’ll get what you deserve
Now brace yourself
All hell breaks
All hell breaks loose
All hell breaks loose
Yeah

Fucked up, this system
Shut it down
Drowned In Disease
Staccato Bursts of blood prelude a flat line ending
Suffocation of a race
The persistent beings
Of life

Parkway Drive – Hollow (feat. Marshall Lichtenwaldt of The Warriors) lyrics

Lies!

My truth has been revealed
At the cost of everything I knew
My last safe-haven falls behind me
With the self that once consumed

Into the void
I’m pursuing only answers
I’m shedding skins and faces
Past loves and bitter hatreds

And it has come to pass
A path set in stone now breaks like glass
The failings of yesterday
Become the catalyst to seek my change

And it has come to pass
A path set in stone now breaks like glass
The failings of yesterday become my catalyst

So here I stand, a stranger to my new-found freedom
I am a vessel
I am a vessel without destination, devoid of direction

No roles define me, yet conflict embraces me
At the mercy if lucidity
I am adrift in a world all too real

A hollow man!

Into the arms of eternal struggle
I must condemn
My restless mind
I must condemn
My restless mind

And it has come to pass
A path set in stone now breaks like glass
The failings of yesterday
Become my catalyst to seek my change

And it has come to pass
A path set in stone now breaks like glass
The failings of yesterday
Become my catalyst

I seek the guidance gained from silence
Illumination from within the darkness
My council kept with the emptiness
In the heart of the unknown

Don Hertzfeldt’s World of Tomorrow, Episode Two Is 22 Minutes of Genius You’ll Want to Watch Over and Over

Greil Marcus once asked his readers to imagine Carlos Santana “going through his the-pain-of-the-universe-is-in-my-guitar routine, with a ukulele,” and it’s a good analogy for what Don Hertzfeldt does with animation. Hertzfeldt’s early short films like “Lily and Jim” and “Billy’s Balloon” lured viewers in with their minimalist, almost crude stick-figure artwork and then hit them with emotions ranging from deep discomfort to profound dread, as if a second-grade assembly had suddenly turned into a Harold Pinter play. With “Rejected,” he embraced full-throttle existential terror; the film, which starts out as a goofy gag, starts to disassemble itself as it goes, and your mind falls apart along with it.

In Everything Will Be OK, a quasi-feature composed of three shorts, the first of which is also called “Everything Will Be OK,” Hertzfeldt took on that kind of deterioration directly, using increasingly sophisticated film techniques without losing the elemental quality at the core of his style. And though he has shifted to digital animation with his latest movies, World of Tomorrow and World of Tomorrow, Episode Two—the first is on Netflix, the latter has just been released on demand—they’re still deceptive in their simplicity, plopping skeletal, 2-D characters in the middle of geometric and cosmological landscapes that constantly shift under their feet.

World of Tomorrow, Episode Two is subtitled “The Burden of Other People’s Thoughts,” and like the first, it features Hertzfeldt’s niece, Winona Mae, as a child named Emily and the British actress Julia Pott as one of her clones from the future. In Episode Two, Emily Prime, as the future Emilys call her, is visited by Emily 6 (Pott), one of a long line of Emily clones whose bodies have been used as repositories for the original Emily’s transplanted memories. With Emily 6, however, the transplant didn’t quite take; she’s an incomplete copy, a damaged replica. She’s come back from the future, where they still haven’t quite mastered time travel—or even how to pronounce the words “time travel”—to graft young Emily’s memories onto hers, but she doesn’t exactly get the child’s consent, and as she begins the process, she warns her that merging their minds may be a traumatic process: “I have a suffered a great deal, and my subconscious is not a pleasant place.”

It’s not easy to describe what happens after that. As with the first film, Hertzfeldt constructed the story around audio recordings of his niece at play, but whereas with the first he was main dealing with the adorable burblings of a four-year-old, he found that repeating the process a year later, “I was facing down long, rambling monologues from a small crazy person.” The world of World of Tomorrow was already one of abrupt leaps in time and space, of offhand predictions of doom and fleeting but intense bursts of sentiment—the first film’s “We loved each other as if we were both originals” floors me with its beauty every time I watch—and that sense of disjuncture is only heightened by the fragmented way its narrative was assembled. What seem to be absurdist asides, like Emily 6’s reference to “my experimental sister, who lived in a tube in the stars,” accrue both meaning and feeling as we go along, and a statement as simple as “I am glad we were alive at the same time” takes on almost overwhelming significance.

As moving and occasionally frightening as Episode Two can be—imagine the “I can feel my mind going” sequence from 2001, only from HAL 9000’s point of view—it’s also incredibly, sometimes painfully, funny. A conversation between Emily Prime and a similarly aged version of Emily 6 plays out like a cosmic version of the mirror scene from Duck Soup, and the appearance of “memory tourists” who tromp through Emily Prime’s mind with the equivalent of muddy boots on serves as a wry commentary on the compulsion to document precious moments instead of actually living them.

That sounds like a lot to pack into 22 minutes, and it is; I’ve seen Episode Two four times now and I feel like I’ve barely scratched the surface. Five bucks might seem like a steep price to rent a short film for a week, and I could appeal to your superego and point out that Hertzfeldt is a true independent in a culture increasingly short on them, and that you’d be contributing to the miracle of his continued existence. But let’s put it in self-interested terms instead: You’ll need, and want, to watch Episode Two again and again to fully absorb its strange wonder. I know I will.

Jimmy Kimmel’s “As Seen on TV Gift Guide” Is a Horrifying, Wonderful Tour of the Year’s Dumbest Inventions

The best thing about living under capitalism is watching the crazy ideas our fellow citizens come up with in their usually futile bids to escape the wolves at the door. You can build an entire industry on creating a problem then selling the solution, but you have to choose your problem carefully. That’s exactly what the inventors highlighted in Jimmy Kimmel’s “As Seen on TV Gift Guide 2017” didn’t do, and it’s amazing. (In keeping with the video’s theme of offering solutions for problems you don’t have, we’re running this gift guide on Dec. 30.)

There’s something heartening about these dumb ideas floating around in the television backwaters, both for the ingenuity with which the inventors approached non-problems, and the shamelessness of their hustle. Whether you’re not having a problem putting on your socks in the morning or not having a problem linking your smartphone to your salt shaker, it’s good to know that a huckster will eventually crop up to solve your non-problem in exchange for a modest fee. But the most reassuring thing about these absurd inventions: so far they haven’t really caught on. A “smart salt dispenser” is a terrible idea, yes, but it’s a much less terrible idea than Soylent, and Soylent raised $50 million just this year. Whether you think that’s a triumph of con-artistry or confirmation that this whole shambling system is ruled by dumb luck depends on your point of view (and how much Soylent you’ve choked down), but there’s one thing we can all agree on: the person who convinced Bell & Howell to slap their venerable name on an invention that is literally “a flashlight you can beat people with” deserves a goddamn medal.

Someone Is Missing From The Daily Show’s In Memoriam Reels for Trump Officials and Sexual Harassers

The Daily Show produced two beautiful In Memoriam reels to remember those we lost in 2017, and if they don’t make you tear up, congratulations, you’re not an awful person. Above is a sad look back at the Trump administration officials we were all forced to get to know over the year, only to have them abruptly leave the stage when their boss got bored with them. From Steve Bannon to Tom Price, it’s a moving look at dedicated servants of Mammon who, with any luck, will forever be remembered for lasting less time in the Trump White House than walking-affirmative-action-bake-sale Stephen fucking Miller. But that wasn’t the only In Memoriam reel from Trevor Noah and company; The Daily Show also marked some of the careers that came to a screeching halt in 2017 over allegations of sexual harassment:

While it’s always fun to see people who did bad things getting their long-delayed comeuppance, it does seem like someone pretty important is missing from both reels. What if there were an extremely high-level Trump administration official who also faced numerous credible allegations of sexual misconduct? What if we completely and utterly failed to make that person face any consequences for his or her behavior, even in a year in which so many other chits finally, almost unbelievably came due?

What a sad world that would be. Let’s hope 2018 brings better news!

Watch Strong Bad Battle French-Canadians in a New Dangeresque Adventure

In all the last-minute preparations for Christmas this year, Slate neglected to inform its readers that Homestarrunner.com has posted a thrilling new Dangeresque adventure, a shocking error we are correcting today. Dangeresque, you will recall, is Strong Bad’s homemade action movie franchise—installments include Dangeresque II: This Time, It’s Not Dangeresque 1, and Dangeresque 3: The Criminal Projective—in which Dangeresque fights the law, but he also fights the crime, but not as much. This time, Dangeresque has to get by without his sidekick Renaldo, probably because this episode was done with puppets instead of animation and there’s no Coach Z puppet. But he gets some holiday help from Firebert, a member of the G.I. Joe-like “Cheat Commandos.” Homestar also makes a crucial appearance in the role of “Stingy Relenque,” a French-Canadian smuggler who owes more than a little to Twin Peaks’ Jacques Renault.

Thematically, however, Dangeresque: Puppet Squad – The Hot Jones Hijack is even bleaker than Twin Peaks. While Dale Cooper’s quest to save Laura Palmer from her inevitable fate leads to disaster, Dangeresque doesn’t even mention Cutesy Buttons, his one-time love interest—it’s apparently too painful for him. Instead, he spends this entire installment attempting to procure a beverage called “Hot Jones” so that he can attend the Cheat Commandos’ Decemberween party. It’s sad to see America’s favorite private eye, crooked cop, secret agent and celebrity pharmacist reduced to substance abuse and social climbing, but it feels right for 2017, a year in which our heroes failed us. Or did I?

In Exchange for a Political Donation, David Simon Will Personally Apologize for Killing Omar on The Wire

Author and journalist David Simon, the creator and showrunner of The Wire, has found a unique way to raise money for Democratic candidates: anyone who donates $1,000 or more to a slate of progressive congressional candidates before midnight will receive a personal apology from Simon for killing off beloved character Omar Little. Little, played by Michael K. Williams, was a charming and intelligent stickup artist who made a living robbing drug dealers; he was eventually—and unceremoniously—shot to death in the show’s final season. Simon made the offer on Twitter, while explaining the urgency: the candidates in question must raise $100,000 by the end of 2017 to earn matching funds from the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee:

Simon has already offered a few online apologies for Little’s death to donors, including one apology for Omar’s death to someone who actually wanted an apology for killing off Wallace (Michael B. Jordan):

The candidates Simon is soliciting donations for are all first-time office seekers, running in rural districts—exactly the sort of races the national party often ignores. The slate consists of Marge Doyle (CA-8), Greg Edwards (PA-15), Jared Golden (ME-2), Mad Hildebrandt (NM-2), Jessica Holcombe (CA-1), Jess King (PA-16), J.D. Scholten (IA-4), and Paul Spencer (AR-2). Fans of The Wire who thought the second season was a misstep and the fifth season was a disappointment—i.e., non-fans of The Wire—can broaden the scope of Simons’ apology for just a little more money:

Now if we can only get George Lucas to start offering apologies for the Star Wars prequels, we’ll have single-payer health care in no time.

Here Are Our Favorite Moments From 2017

Another year has come and gone, and as we look back on the sometimes troubling, sometimes nightmarish, sometimes horrible, sometimes awful, and sometimes just plain bad year that was 2017, it’s important to remember that some good things happened, too. Here, then, are 2017’s high points—the moments when, despite all the chaos, it seemed like everything was probably going to turn out all right, and we could all relax and enjoy ourselves:

Welp. Better luck next year!

Why Star Wars: The Last Jedi Isn’t Actually a Box-Office Disappointment

There’s an odd debate happening right now around the box-office performance of Star Wars: The Last Jedi. Said debate stems from the film’s second-weekend performance, which followed the second-largest opening weekend of all time, ranking only behind its predecessor, Star Wars: The Force Awakens. But on that second weekend, The Last Jedi declined 67.5 percent from its opening-weekend gross, which is… a lot.

How bad is it? That’s the subject of debate, with opinions ranging from “an epic Hollywood choke” to “a scheduling snafu.” (The Last Jedi’s second weekend included Christmas Eve, a notoriously poor day for the box office.) On the one hand, that tumble is almost as bad as Batman v Superman’s notorious 69.1 percent drop—and worse than Suicide Squad’s 67.4 percent! On the other, The Last Jedi has already become the second-highest-grossing domestic release of the year after just 14 days in theaters, with Beauty and the Beast about to cede the top spot sooner rather than later—so what’s the big deal?

The big deal is that this performance links up with another narrative currently making the rounds: that the public doesn’t like this movie. While The Last Jedi, which met with widespread critical praise, sports an A Cinemascore—same as Force Awakens, and same as last year’s inaugural spinoff, Rogue One: A Star Wars Story—other audience-based metrics online have pointed to a less stellar reception, along with your typical social-media-based wailing and gnashing of teeth. Even if the scale of this response is pretty dodgy—loud voices online do not a public make—the sense of such a response is certainly in the air, and it seems to correlate with the second-weekend dip. But—say it with me now—correlation does not equal causation, and what The Last Jedi’s box-office performance might really be in need of is a little context.

The first problem is that we don’t really have a great comparison point for The Last Jedi. Sure, there was The Force Awakens two years ago, which came out on the same date in December, but The Force Awakens was the first Star Wars movie in a decade, not to mention a film that promised a return to the original trilogy after three, uh, controversial prequels. The Last Jedi, on the other hand, is the third Star Wars movie in three years, and it comes with the promise of another Star Wars movie every year going forward until VR technology lets you live life as a porg. Comparing the performance of The Last Jedi to the pre–Force Awakens franchise is meaningless thanks to the changes in moviegoing over the years, but comparing it to The Force Awakens also sets an impossibly high bar: Sequels in general don’t do as well as their predecessors, a phenomenon that’s become even more pronounced in the era of cinematic universes, and expecting The Last Jedi to match either the gross or the hold of The Force Awakens seems unrealistic. Let’s remember that The Force Awakens made $2 billion worldwide; only two other films have managed that, Avatar and Titanic, and they did so in a completely different manner, against less competition and at a far slower pace. The Force Awakens didn’t just top Jurassic World, the next biggest earner worldwide, it made 25 percent more than the dinosaurs did; it’s a statistical anomaly, and comparing any other movie to it, even another Star Wars movie, isn’t terribly productive.

But what about the MCU? you might say, hanging from a web on the ceiling. Yes, the MCU’s sequels have generally improved on their predecessors, but there’s one movie in the MCU that does seem to offer a better point of comparison for The Last Jedi than, say, Jurassic World or Avengers, the films it’s currently being stacked up against due to its astronomically high first-weekend gross—two films, it bears mentioning, that were (a) another long-awaited comeback of a beloved franchise, and (b) a then-innovative synthesis of various beloved franchises that had never been seen before. That would be Avengers: Age of Ultron, the sequel to the fifth-highest-grossing movie of all time.

Like The Last Jedi, Age of Ultron opened big but not quite as big as its predecessor, managing a $191 million first weekend versus the $207 million of Avengers. More instructively, though, Age of Ultron also experienced a fairly severe second-weekend dip, falling 59.4 percent versus Avengers’ mere 50.4 percent dip—and in Ultron’s case, against nearly nonexistent competition, with the next-best performer being the debut of Hot Pursuit at a measly $14 million. No other movie managed more than $6 million that weekend; compare that to The Last Jedi’s second weekend, on which Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle and The Greatest Showman both debuted—not to mention weaker performers like Downsizing and Father Figures, also in wide release. That is a sizable amount of competition, especially considering the success of Jumanji, and the comparison looks even more favorable to Last Jedi if you factor in the whole Christmas Eve Sunday hit.

And then there’s the second problem. While Age of Ultron, as well as another useful comp, Captain America: Civil War—which also saw a 60 percent second-weekend drop—both came out in May, doing the majority of their business on Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays, The Last Jedi’s December–slash–Christmas holiday release allows the weekdays to become de facto weekends for a movie of this wattage. Once you factor in that element, a completely different picture emerges: At day 13, The Last Jedi boasts a remarkable $445 million, which looks awfully good when you compare it to Age of Ultron’s $329 million at the same point in its release, not to mention Civil War’s $311 million. In fact, it renders all second-weekend evaluations completely premature: While the ten-day charts saw The Last Jedi fall behind Avengers and Jurassic World, the nature of this holiday dynamic allowed it to immediately surge past both films by the following Wednesday. (This doesn’t even get into international grosses, which are just fine, with a China release still to come.)

So yes, if your only comparison points for The Last Jedi are the three highest-grossing movies of all time, all of which rode massive, years-long waves of nostalgia and anticipation, you could conceivably call it a disappointment—and even then, you’d probably still be wrong. (Wonder Woman, the year’s most buzzed-about film? The Last Jedi outgrossed it in less than two weeks.) But if you take into account even one of the many factors that might suggest why its second weekend fell so drastically from its first, it becomes clear that The Last Jedi is an achievement without a proper benchmark, a film that should have no difficulty becoming the highest-grossing proper sequel ever made. If that achievement isn’t enough to be considered a success, then the fault might lie with the expectations, not the performance being measured.

See also: The 10 Horniest Things in Star Wars: The Last Jedi

Does The Post Give the Washington Post Too Much Credit? The New York Times Seems to Think So.

Is that some not-so-subtle shade we do detect in the pages of the New York Times?

Steven Spielberg’s Oscars front-runner The Post, starring Meryl Streep and Tom Hanks, recounts a nation-defining story of power and the press—of speaking truth to one and enshrining freedom of the other. The docudrama, set in the summer of 1971, follows the Washington Post in its decision to publish excerpts from the top-secret Pentagon Papers, after an injunction restrained the New York Times, which first broke the story, from continuing to do so. It’s told from the perspective of the scrappy D.C. paper’s brave publisher Katharine Graham (Streep) and bold editor Ben Bradlee (Hanks), faced with the momentous decision—nay, the moral burden—to report the story and uphold freedom of the press in the process. It’s been repeatedly called a prequel to All The President’s Men, another celebration of a historic Washington Post story.

But it’s the snubbed New York Times that has been especially interested in rehashing the history the film portrays. The story told in The Post is, afterall, a major moment in the Times’ history. The Grey Lady has covered the release extensively within its pages, throwing shady reminders of its under-recognized role in the Pentagon Papers story—and to whom we really owe a debt for enshrining freedom of the press.

The House Ad

In a full-page house ad in its culture section on Thursday, the New York Times reminded its readers of the real hero of new film’s story: The Times. Promoting The Pentagon Papers, a 1971 book about the legendary scoop, the ad reads, “The Pentagon Papers as Published in the New York Times,” pointing out that it was the Times—not the Post—which won a Pulitzer for its reporting.

The Culture Writer

Even the briefest of articles include a reminder that it was the Times who first broke the story. In a summary of The Post’s trailer back in November, Bruce Fretts was sure to note in a parenthetical aside that “The New York Times ran the first reports on the papers and published some of the documents, but was barred from following up by a court order. The Washington Post then stepped in.” In the Washington Post’s equivalent, Stephanie Merry acknowledged, wearily, that “yes, we know the New York Times did it first.”

The Film Critic

In her review of the film (Dec. 21), New York Times chief film critic Manohla Dargis throws some light shade of her own. She explains that “the real story” began with the New York Times, and points out that the Washington Post had been “publishing rewrites of The Times’s articles” up until the docudrama’s key events.

“Shaping a drama around a newspaper that didn’t break the story seems an odd path to Hollywood triumphalism,” write Dargis, adding that “it’s no surprise that the movie omits and elides important players and crucial episodes.” She also links to an excerpt from Inside the Pentagon Papers, an account of the events written by New York Times columnist Anthony Lewis.

The Media Critic

The most overt criticism in the Times’ pages might be found in Jim Rutenberg’s Dec. 24 Mediator column. The Post—which he notes “some people around here believe should be called The Times”—fails to give equal weight to the arguably greater risk undertaken by Times publisher Arthur O. Sulzberger. “It is an unfortunate irony,” notes Rutenberg, “that the makers of a film dedicated to the pursuit of truth took dramatic license with Mr. Sulzberger, who died in 2012, in their worthy elevation of Ms. Graham, who died in 2001.” Spielberg’s film implies that Sulzberger only published the papers when his Washington bureau chief threatened to take the papers elsewhere, downplaying his “bold decision,” which in reality involved the risk of “20 years to life.”

Rutenberg also quotes disgruntled former Times staff. In a statement to Rutenberg, Neil Sheehan—the Times’ lead reporter on the story, who is barely seen in the film—praised Sulzberger, who was known as Punch, as the true trailblazer in those fateful weeks. “There was a precedent for Kay Graham. Punch had no precedent.” (In an interview with current Washington Post editor Marty Baron, Hanks said that it is Graham’s story that makes The Post what it is: “They didn’t have Katharine Graham, in all honesty. If they had a Katharine Graham we’d be calling it the New York Times.”)

The Reporter

In a Dec. 20 piece pegged to the release of the film, “Behind the Race to Publish the Top-Secret Pentagon Papers,” Times reporter Niraj Chokshi describes the history of the Times’ incredible Pentagon Papers scoop (the film, he says, “depicts the race at The Washington Post to catch up to Mr. Sheehan’s exclusive”). Chokshi’s account focuses closely on the incredible work done by the Times, work which goes underrecognised in the film. He describes the paper’s refusal to bow to pressure from an angry Nixon administration, and quotes the memoir of the study’s leaker, Daniel Ellsberg: “Only The Times might publish the entire study, and it had the prestige to carry it through.”

The Urban Affairs Correspondent

In “Who’s Who in ‘The Post’: A Guide to the Players in a Pivotal Era” (Dec. 25), urban affairs correspondent Sam Roberts explains the story’s real background. “Though the film focuses on The Post and its publisher, Katharine Graham, it was The Times that spent three months reviewing the papers, then publishing articles about them beginning June 13, 1971,” he writes. “The Times defied a Nixon administration warning to stop but abided by a preliminary injunction granted June 15.” Like Goodale, Roberts gives the D.C. paper full credit for Watergate, but not this one, pointing out that “The Post later led the way on Watergate; The Times dominated the Pentagon Papers coverage.”

“The Times correspondent who actually broke the Pentagon Papers exposé is barely seen onscreen,” he writes. Nor are the intense, decisive exchanges between the Times’ editor and publisher, which resembled those portrayed in the film between Bradlee and Graham.

The Washington Post offered its own historical explainer, which mainly adds legendary WaPo details which Spielberg’s film wasn’t able to include—like when the Chief Justice greeted two Post reporters at his front door, in his bathrobe, clutching a gun. It also clarifies that the D.C. paper never sent an intern to spy on the New York Times.

The Lawyer

James C. Goodale, a member of the New York Times’ in-house counsel at the time of the leak, has also expressed discontent with the film—which he calls “good drama but bad history”—in a piece for The Daily Beast on the day of its Dec. 22 release. “It downplays the role of the true catalyst in the real life drama: The New York Times,” he writes, adding that, “It’s as though Hollywood had made a movie about the Times’s triumphant role in Watergate.”

Kay Graham and Ben Bradlee, he suggests, are probably laughing in their graves at the story Hollywood has given them—they’ve gotten “the lion’s share of the glory” despite the fact that “it was the Times that did the vast majority of the hard work and took on far more risk in publishing the Pentagon Papers.”

Goodale also points to the far greater role played by the Times legal counsel in the Supreme Court case that upheld press freedom, which he notes was called New York Times v. United States, despite the fact that it is the Post staff we cheer along with at the film’s triumphant climax. Goodale explains that it was the Times’ defense, as written by Times lawyer Alex Bickel, which “was quoted almost verbatim by the Supreme Court and became the law of the case.” The Washington Post’s lead lawyer, he complains, never mentioned the First Amendment at all.

The Leadership

Current Times editor Dean Baquet has also made his disapproval known beyond the pages of the Paper of Record. In a recent email published in Poynter, Baquet, who won’t be seeing the film, wrote that “Arthur [Sulzberger] deserves more than the walk-on he gets. And it pains me that a generation won’t ever know the story of a publisher who bet his entire company on the most important journalism decision of an era.”

“I think drama and commerce trumps history in Hollywood,” he added.

As for A.G. Sulzberger, grandson of Arthur and the Times’ soon-to-be publisher? “I think we’re all looking forward to the next Watergate movie,” he told the New Yorker. “Focussing on the extraordinary reporting of the New York Times.”

Women of Hollywood Declare “Time’s Up” on Sexual Harassment

At first it appeared to be simply about famous women wearing black to the 2018 Golden Globes as a symbol of protest, “a silent protest” which Rose McGowan called out in now-deleted tweets.

Now, it has been revealed that the all-black protest is part of something much, much larger—and it’s the opposite of silent.

New Year’s Day saw the announcement of Time’s Up, an initiative made up of over 300 women working in film, television, and theater who have come together to fight sexual harassment and gender inequality within Hollywood and beyond. The leaderless organization, created last year in response to the growing list of high-profile sexual harassers, declares “time’s up” on sexual harassment. It will fight for legislative change, push studios to achieve gender parity by 2020, and provide legal funding to help less privileged women fight workplace harassment. It is also behind calls for women walking the Golden Globes red carpet to wear black, and use the opportunity to speak out about sexual harassment. Members of the group, which is run by volunteers and sounds about as close to a grassroots movement as a Hollywood alliance can be, include Ashley Judd, Eva Longoria, America Ferrera, Natalie Portman, Rashida Jones, Emma Stone, Kerry Washington, and Reese Witherspoon.

In an open letter that began “Dear Sisters,” published in the New York Times and in Spanish-language newspaper La Opinion on January 1, the women of entertainment called out to Latina farmworkers, thanking them for their November letter of solidarity and acknowledging their common experiences. Gender inequality pervades all workplaces, they wrote, “from legislatures to boardrooms to executive suits and management to academia.” Time’s Up Legal Defense Fund—which is spearheaded by Tina Tchen, Michelle Obama’s former chief of staff—is aimed at offering legal assistance to blue-collar workers who are less able to fight unfair treatment. It has so far raised $13 million.

A number of the group’s members spoke to the New York Times about the work that has been going on behind the scenes since the Weinstein news broke in October. Maria Eitel, an expert in corporate responsibility who helps moderate Time’s Up meetings, said that people were “viscerally” moved by the recent spate of allegations. “They didn’t come together because they wanted to whine, or complain, or tell a story or bemoan,” she said. “They came together because they intended to act. There was almost a ferociousness to it, especially in the first meetings.”

Reese Witherspoon said that it was powerful having women come together. “We have been siloed off from each other,” she said. “We’re finally hearing each other, and seeing each other, and now locking arms in solidarity with each other, and in solidarity for every woman who doesn’t feel seen, to be finally heard.”

As the group’s website says: “The clock has run out on sexual assault, harassment and inequality in the workplace. It’s time to do something about it.”

The GOP Tax Plan Meets The Shining in This Funny or Die Parody

Donald Trump has called the GOP tax plan “one of the great Christmas gifts to middle-income people,” but the plan itself will mostly help the superrich get richer. With that in mind, the team over at Funny or Die decided to give the tax bill the cinematic treatment it deserves—by replacing the manuscript from The Shining with a more honest version of Republicans’ plan.

Instead of pages and pages of “All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy,” we get an unending litany of “We don’t care about poor people” (with the occasional annotations to clarify that Republicans don’t really care about women, immigrants, or sick people either). If you think that’s bad, wait until you see the newest photograph on the wall of the Overlook Hotel. Frankly, it’s as scary as anything Kubrick could dream up.